Team Profile – One Doesn’t Swim, One Doesn’t Run

Team profile time – 7 weeks to go until Breca Buttermere. Here’s a couple of guys who look like they’re going to be pretty comfortable in the mountains. Experienced triathletes, wandering adventurers, and a cause for celebration. Lets get to know them.

Team Name: ODSODR (One Doesn’t Swim, One Doesn’t Run)
Team Members: Glenn Tait & Tony Rafferty
Team Motto: “We should start training properly soon…”

Who are you, where are you from and how do you know each other? 
Tony/Glenn:
We are Tony Rafferty, a 32-year-old from Edinburgh and Glenn Tait, a 32-year-old Geordie exiled in Edinburgh. We first met when studying at Heriot Watt University, which seems like ages ago now. Anyway, 10+ years on and we now live in the same area on the outskirts of Edinburgh, which is proving handy now we’re both into doing these silly events. It’s good as we can motivate each other to get out and train, then head to the local to plan the next training session or come up with crazy ideas like signing up for SwimRuns. Was beer to blame for this one? Who knows…

Tony & Glenn – One Doesn’t Swim, One Doesn’t Run

What do you do outside of daft adventures?
Tony
: By day I’m a Test Automation Engineer for a software company. By night and at the weekends I’m a keen swimmer, reader of books, watcher of F1 and consumer of coffee.
Glenn: I work for a Hospitality Solutions Provider on the IT side, and spend a lot of time in pubs and restaurants – both when working and not working. My main interest is running. I prefer to run silly long distances but I’m normally up for any type of adventure and usually make videos of them, which I share on my blog. (which is a link well worth clicking on by the way!)

What’s going to give you the edge over everyone else at Breca Swimrun?
Tony
: As you can tell by the team name we each have our individual strengths. If we could do this as a relay we’d possibly do pretty well. We have a distinct ability to compete with each other without either of us realising it. You should see us walk home from the pub together – it’s quite the footrace.
Glenn loves to buy shiny bits of kit so I’m really hoping this may give us an edge… wishful thinking perhaps?
Glenn: Tony is right, we have individual strengths. I’m always running away from him and he always swims away from me! We’re really going to have to get a tether. We’ve done a lot of work on the hills, spending most time running in the Pentlands, but I’d say we’re still amateur compared to some of the fell runners. I think my shiny new wetsuit will give me the edge – if only to keep up with Tony!

Are you happy with your teammate or are they the only other idiot you could find? Any amusing stories about them you can share?
Tony
: It’s a bit late in the day to say no to being happy with my choice in teammate, isn’t it? In the water, yes Glenn may slow me down, but I’ll do the same on foot so fair is fair. If anything each of us can encourage the other one to keep going in their weaker sport.
I know plenty of idiots but none that share the same appetite for wrapping themselves in neoprene and lycra as I do.
Glenn: No, but he’ll do….. *jokes*. Tony moans too much on the run. To be fair I did recently drag him out on a 32km run when it was only supposed to be 25kms, so I think I might have lost his trust and it certainly didn’t help with the whingeing. I’m just glad Tony can’t hear me moan when we’re swimming as sound waves don’t travel that well in swimming pools.
Any amusing stories about them you can share?
Glenn
: Tony once thought a lamb was a white rabbit just merrily sitting next to a sheep.

What attracted you to this race? 
Tony
: In 2014 I did a middle distance triathlon, which was great fun. Then, in 2015 I did the Edinburgh Marathon, which I found plain old boring. I was looking for something to do in 2016 without doing a full distance triathlon and SwimRun ticked the boxes. I’m hoping the scenery makes up for some of the suffering.
Glenn: I’ve done an Ironman, and the cycling is just too long. I wanted something different – some other challenge – and I like the simplicity of this type race. I was glad to finally persuade Tony to do this after sowing the seed quite a while ago! Plus, the Lakes is an awesome area so it’s going to be stunning and epic no matter what the weather!

Is there anything making you nervous? 
Tony: Definitely the elevation profile and the overall pace we’ll be expected to go at. I have heard that getting the body to transition from swim to run and vice versa multiple times can be a killer too.
Glenn: Yes, Tony’s wife is due to give birth three weeks after this race and I think I know where his priorities will stand when the day gets nearer. It isn’t wearing Lycra with me… Tony, shouldn’t this make you nervous too?

SWIMRUNSCENE

Whats your racing experience like?
Tony: A couple of sprint and Olympic distance triathlons. A middle distance triathlon, lots of open water swimming and last year the Edinburgh marathon.
Glenn: Was Fat. Got not so fat through running in 2010. Went on to do some marathons. Got forced into a sprint triathlon and then forced that person into doing an Ironman with me. I then decided cycling for 8 hours was too much so did Aberfeldy Middle Distance with Tony in 2014, did my first Ultra around Tiree in 2015 and now just keep on running further.  My biggest achievement was Ironman in 2013 but I’m especially proud of my 3hr 30 marathon time!

How’s the build up going?
Tony
: I was planning on doing a couple of fell races but I’ve not found anything that tickles my fancy yet. Suggestions on races in central/southern Scotland on a postcard please
The training has been in fits and starts to be honest. We’ve been in the pool twice a week and running three times a week. We’re planning on doing some SwimRun specific sessions in the run up to Breca to work out the logistics of transitioning from OW to running up hills. We’re super lucky to have the Pentland Hills only 10 minutes from our door step.
Glenn: I’ve been building up my running to run the John Muir Way Ultramarathon, but I’ve nothing after that until Breca. I agree – we do need to find some local fell races. Training is haphazard really. I swim once/twice a week when I can be bothered to get out of bed early, and run 3 times a week as Tony says. More recently I’ve been trying to complete the 255km John Muir Way trail coast to coast since 1st April and I’ve just done that so been putting some decent running miles in! I think when the reservoirs in the Pentland hills reach a warmer temp we’ll be up there getting some SwimRun practice in!

Getting some hill practice in

Will you be making a weekend of it?
Tony/Glenn:
Yes, we’re coming down on the Friday, staying Friday and Saturday (beer!) night then back home on the Sunday. We’re staying in Keswick because we didn’t get ourselves organised in time to get anything in Buttermere booked. It’s also Glenn’s birthday on race day so there’ll be some birthday celebrations once we finish. Please cheer us on and feel free to bring us cake!

Are there any questions you’d like to put to other teams/organisers/experienced SwimRunners? 
Tony: To the other teams: please don’t make us look too bad. To experienced SwimRunners: for fuelling, should we carry a couple clif bars in a pocket and eat going up hill or, struggle on without fuelling? Also, socks or no socks?
Glenn: I hadn’t thought about socks – that’s a good question! Tony: I will let you store some cliff bars in my shiny new wetsuit (it even has a pocket – how fancy) if you drag me through the water, thanks! To the experienced SwimRunners: does a tether get in the way?

You can follow Tony & Glenn’s exploits on Twitter, just click on their names for profiles.

Want to read about some of the other teams involved on July 2nd? Here’s a list of profiles so far…

Tuff Fitty
Tri Energy Mums
ATC Triology
2 Slow 2 Win, 2 Dumb 2 Quit
A Geordie & A Frog

 

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Race Report – Three Forts Half Marathon

The Three Forts Half Marathon

Pre-race

I arrived at Hill Barn Playing fields after my normal Sunday morning 0-5k group run. This served as a nice warm-up without taxing the legs too much, although I probably wouldn’t do it if was a serious target race.
The sun was shining and it was warm enough to strip down to race kit nice and early. I went through my normal warm-up routine and enjoyed the relaxed atmosphere around the start-line.
An old family friend of mine, Andy (Wiggy) had come down from the Midlands to run the full, his first marathon and I found him looking nervous amongst the 700 or so people milling around. I reminded him of a 3k fun-run we’d done together, we must have only been about 6 years old. Our Dad’s then went on to do the 5 or 10k race afterwards but we weren’t allowed to do that one. Wiggy didn’t remember any of this and I don’t think it helped settle his nerves!

team tuff
Me, Sim and Dom

At 10am the full marathoners were off and the number of people in the field was reduced by half. I had a pre-race chat with Simone and Dom from my Tri Club (Tuff Fitty) and Simon, my wingman from ShoreFit run club. We were all in high spirits and really looking forward to having a nice run on the South Downs.
As we posed for a Tuff Fitty team photo, we suddenly heard the Town Crier ringing his bell and shouting GO! – for a moment we thought we’d missed the start of our race but he was only setting off the Cani-X runners! Phew!

With a few minutes to go, I made my way to the front row of the start line and got ready to go.

Mile 1-2
Another ring of the Town Criers bell and we were off, I found myself part of a group of 4 runners as we made the first climb up Cissbury Ring. 500ft of ascent later and we’d already put quite a gap on the next group.
We rounded the top and went full throttle into the chalky descent around the back. I’d opted for my retired Adidas Adios 2’s for this race as they’ve got nothing left in them for the roads but I thought they’d be OK on dry trails. Some of the chalk paths were baked as hard as concrete and I was kind of wishing I’d gone for something with a bit more cushioning left in them.
I grabbed a cup of water at the first aid station and failed miserably at getting any more than 2 drops into my mouth.

Mile 3
This section is normally pretty quick, I should be going at sub-7min pace along here quite comfortably……only I’m not. The guys in front of me are moving away and I’ve got a crippling pain trying to fold me in half.
I thought it was a stitch at the time, and I blamed/cursed those water drops a few moments earlier. With hindsight, I recognise that the effort I’d put in going up and down the first hill had given me abdominal cramps, it was nothing to do with the water and it wasn’t a stitch. I slowed my pace and as I tried to get control of my body again I was caught by the next group of runners.

Mile 4-7
Uphill…..Uphill…..then a bit more Uphill. Another 500ft upwards. Resulting in fine views from Chanctonbury Ring of both the North and South Downs. Managed to negotiate a couple of cattle grids at the top by running straight over them rather than waste time with the National Trust gates. One of the few benefits of size 12 running shoes.

Mile 8-10
Downhill, in varying degrees. Culminating in a quad-smashing 12% descent. All this sounds wonderful, and it was a great opportunity to get my breath back a bit, but it destroyed my legs just before I hit one of the hardest climbs of the race.

Miles 11-13.1
I was passed here by numerous runners, I muttered a “well-done” and felt like an extra weight had been added to my legs with each one that went by. The last climb up Cissbury ring reduced me to walking, although it was probably more efficient than my running at that point.

The bit that I had been dreading the most was the final downhill section. Its a single track chalk trail that I always avoid in training. Its rutted with a deep uneven groove where the rain drains away and you have to zigzag down it, leaping over the chasm, praying that you don’t turn an ankle. A chap in a yellow vest flew past me with the ease of a mountain goat, I honestly don’t know how he could be so sure-footed here, fair play.

I finally emerged onto the playing field where it all began, ankles intact, and mustered up the strongest finish I could manage. I heard my name being called by the commentator. I could see literally 10’s of people clapping and cheering. I crossed the line in 1:42:24. Not bad. (The winners time was 1:27:xx for an indication of how tough the course is – his marathon PB is 2:46)

image1

Post Race

The mayor put a medal around my neck and I promptly fell over. The medal wasn’t heavy, it wasn’t like an anvil, I just couldn’t stand up anymore.
I looked over at the massage tent and decided to crawl over and get a post-event rub down whilst there was no queue.
My wife and son came and found me on the table, and then we all went and cheered on some of the finishers until the boy got restless.

Reflections

I wanted to see what my limitations were with this race and to try and get in amongst the leaders. I very quickly found out that I need to do more hill-work, and perhaps some more core-work if I want to put myself near the front here.
I’ll definitely be back to race this one next year and aiming to better my 18th position.
Out of my pre-race goals (see here) I missed both A (Top 3) and B (Top 10), but pleased to not come away injured which was my C goal, should probably make this a general life goal.
I had slight tingling in my feet at the end which I’m attributing to my shoe choice, simply not enough cushioning for hard packed descents. Grip wasn’t an issue though and it was nice to give them a farewell race.

Final word

A great race over a beautiful challenging course, with cheerful marshals, well stocked aid stations and excellent post-race facilities. With under 1000 runners across the 2 events, the organisers still lay on free (charitable donation) massage and all the cakes/pastries you can eat as well as a finishers medal. We were blessed with fine weather this year which made it all the more enjoyable.

Highly Recommended!

medal

#Swimrun Training – Week 5

Total Miles: 28 Miles 
Average Pace:
 9:04 min/mile
Longest Run: 14 miles  – 50% of total
Speedwork: 2.8 miles – 10% of total

This week was spent waiting for my legs to recover properly from the Three Forts Half Marathon.
I’m surprised that race took as much out of me as it did, I kind of thought I’d be able to resume training as normal immediately afterwards, that’s why I opted for the half over the full distance. Boy was I wrong! My legs still feel like jelly now.

I skipped my run/swim/run session this week as I felt too tired. My legs felt like I’d probably trip over if I tried to run, let alone throw a swim in there as well. Aside from my Saturday afternoon splash about with my son in the small pool at Splash Point, that meant no swimming at all this week.

Workout of the Week

600 Breakdowns
(600/400/300/200) x 3 – 300m jog recoveries

Out of the sessions that I did manage to hit, Wednesday night track was probably my favourite.
As we’re now into triathlon racing season, our emphasis at the track is moving more towards fast reps to push VO2 max and improve running form. There’s nothing quite like running fast to focus on every aspect of your body position. Drills are good for concentrating on links in the chain, but actually pushing the pace makes you think about what your hips are doing, and whether you’re really pushing that ground away behind you.

The 600’s were really tough, and I think I still had too much of the HM in my legs to be able to maintain the pace I wanted in these. I dropped a few seconds on each set on these longer reps. But I felt great for anything 400m and under, hitting all my splits and putting in a good hard effort.

One of the session aims was “Exhilaration Not Exhaustion,” to enjoy the sensation of running fast. I reckon I was 50/50 by the end of the evening, great fun.

I popped out on Friday to do 10 miles which would have been fine had I not chosen a route that was 14 miles long. I accidentally ran up the Ferring Rife too which was midge central. Trying to run with your mouth closed after 11 miles is impossible and looking in the mirror when I got home, my face looked like a car numberplate after a 200mile motorway journey, covered in dead flies! (I promise you, I was not running that fast!)

Next week I’m hoping to get back to some sort of consistency, the balance of  speed/long/easy running is all wrong at the moment and I definitely need to get back in the pool.
I guess overall though, not a bad recovery week.

Over and Out.

April Training

The Numbers:

Mileage for the month – 175 miles
Biggest week – 67.3 miles
Longest run16 Miles 

APRIL

The Positives

April was great, I really enjoyed the consistency I achieved this month. And it paid off.
I hit my target for mileage (just about), and my longest run was a 1:58 16miler. I managed to swim 3 out of 4 weeks too, running to and from the pool each time.

The Even More Positives

I surpassed my A target in the mid-month 5k race, setting a new PB of 18:11 which I know I can beat in better conditions. Especially if I can keep the training up. I’m fairly confident of going sub-18 in my next outing.

The Must Do Betters

Now we’ve got lighter evenings, I need to make the most of the opportunity to run some off-road hills. The 3 Forts Half route, and some trails around Cissbury & Chanctonbury Ring are going to become very good friends of mine very soon.
I also need to start getting my kit sorted, I’ve got my eye on a wetsuit, and also some trail shoes. And then its just the accessories. I hope to have all this sorted by the end of May.

The only kit I’ve got so far is the socks! I’ve been trialling almost the full range of Gococo‘s sports socks over the last few months and I’ve put aside a pair of the Compression Superior socks for race day already. Completely blister-proof, warm without being too warm (37.5 technology), and a perfect level of compression that leaves my calves feeling great no matter what the session.

Thanks Gococo for all your support during my training so far!

Any Other Business

I’m now an ITEC Level 4 Sports Massage Therapist. That means I can assess and give treatments with knowledge, skill and confidence. If you’re in Worthing (or local areas) and you’re in need of a massage either to keep you going, or to get you on the road to recovery then give me a shout.

May Goals:
Mileage: 175 miles
Long Run: 16 miles off road
Swim: Once a week (at least)
Yoga: Every Damn Day
Kit: Get my kit list sorted

 

#Swimrun Training – Week 4

Total Miles: 18 Miles 
Average Pace:
 7:54min/mile (approx best guess)
Longest Run: 13.2 miles – 3 Forts Half Marathon – 73% of total
Speedwork: 0

Sometimes life just gets in the way of all the miles you’d like to put in.

LIFE

My wife has been running a wellbeing retreat this week, its the first full one she’s set up and hosted and I’m massively proud of what she’s achieved. She’s done everything from finding the venue, setting up the website and making all the bookings,  to delivering Pilates and Health Coaching sessions. Not to mention all the cooking that went with it. She landed features in some great magazines along the way and importantly learnt some valuable lessons to take forwards into the next one. (which is running from 11/7/16 to 15/7/16 if you’re interested!)

Whilst she was out doing this, I had my ITEC Sports Massage Level 4 exam to work towards (And also a folder full of case studies and assignments to submit). So every evening after the boy was in bed, I had time to apply myself fully to this task. The first half of the week went by in a bit of a desperate blur, I think there was a 3am, a 2am and a 1am finish on consecutive nights whilst I put the finishing touches to my folder.

Saturday morning arrived and I was a bag of nerves as I made my way over to Brighton for my practical exam. I was comfortable with the client assessment and the treatment but I was really stressed out about the questions that the examiner was going to ask me whilst I was working.
My client helpfully through a few curveballs at me before the exam started by telling me that almost every part of her legs had some sort of niggle. This gave me something else to think about rather than the stress.
An hour later, and I was told I’d passed – I am now a Level 4 Sports Massage Therapist.

I went home and ran the final 2 miles I needed to get me up to my target for April. Boom! Thats 2 goals in one day!

My week finished with the 3 Forts Half Marathon on Sunday – which you can read about in my race report. Unfortunately, my watch won’t upload the data so I guess that means I’m just going to have to go out and run it again, I’m glad its on my doorstep.

image1

 

3 Forts Half 2016 – Pre-Race Goals

I normally keep my race goals to myself, that way I don’t suffer embarrassment if I don’t meet my ambitions.

But…..in my March roundup I set myself and published some race goals for the 5k I did last week. I set A,B and C goals, all of which were better than any time I’d ever run before – and proceeded to surpass all of them.

So I thought I’d do the same for the Three Forts Half Marathon I’m running on Sunday. Why not eh?

I’ve never raced a Half Marathon before, so I’ve got no official race time to beat. In training, Strava tells me that my best HM time is 1:28:31 so maybe I should aim to go quicker than that? It was last Feb after all.

The problem here, is that the 3 Forts route is very hilly, and that time was set on a very flat run. So I look back at my training and find….. this. I’ve run the race route before in training, and very nice it was too. My time back then, Boxing Day of 2013, was 1:48:17. Why the hell was I out running in the afternoon of Boxing Day 2013?

Whilst I’m confident I can beat that, I’m not so sure about going under 1:28.

I know, I’ll feed my recent 5k time into the Jack Daniels pace calculator. That will give me a pace to aim for on the flat sections…

pace

Ha! You’ve got to be kidding me – not sure I’m in that sort of shape Jack!

So I’m just going to go out and RACE

And I mean Properly race, not looking at my watch, not worrying about going too fast in the middle section and not fearing blowing up at mile 11. I don’t care if the wheels come off as it will show me where my limits are. Maybe watching my pace is holding me back and I should run to feel a bit more. Or maybe I’ll report back here next week describing how I went though all sorts of delusional pain just to maintain a walk of shame.

So, following on from a 4th place finish in my last race, I figure that my A goal should be to improve on that.

Goal A
Top 3 (even I’m not stupid enough to aim for the win)

Goal B
Top 10 (I think even this will mean a tough run)

Goal C
Survive the race without twisting an ankle!

Lofty goals there, but as you can see from the last one, I’m really just planning on enjoying the race. I really enjoyed being at the pointy end of the action in my last outing and I want to recapture that feeling in this one.

I want to be surging up hills, making breakaways, and collecting prizes. I realize that I’m probably not quite there yet but hey, I can see how long I can hang on in there for!

#Swimrun Training – Week 3

Total Miles: 46 Miles + 2.8k swim + 30mile bike
Average Pace:
 7:54min/mile
Longest Run: 13.2 Miles (Saturday) = 29% of weekly total
Speedwork: 3 miles = 6.5% of weekly total

week3

Happy with the way that week went. I started out with a mini taper knowing that I wanted to run well on Wednesday at the Splash Point 5k. And I closed the week out with a swim/run effort and a half marathon steady paced run.

Favourite Session of the Week

Easily, without a doubt, my nice shiny new PB at the Splash Point 5k. I’m not going to rewrite the report here, but if you want to read the blow-by-blow post of how it went down, then read this post.
In short, the conditions weren’t easy, and I knocked 82s off my previous time with an 18:11. I placed 4th overall and I know there’s more to come. I’m confident I’ll be able to go under 18mins this Summer.

I feel like my swimming is improving every week, especially since I discovered 3:2 breathing. I’m still concentrating so much though that counting laps is beyond me.

Anything Else

I had lots of Deep Tissue massage on my legs on Saturday and Sunday which felt amazing at the time. My HM effort felt sluggish afterwards though and I kept on battling against the voice telling me to stop. I’d look at my watch and think, “I’m still on pace here” so told myself to man up and see it through!

Going Forwards

Next week is going to be a write off for training as I’ve got an exam to prepare for and sit, and my wife is away for most of the week hosting a wellbeing retreat, this means I can’t get out to run at all. I’m going to use these excuses as a forced taper for the 3 Forts Half Marathon though so its all good, hopefully the rest will ensure my legs are coming into it feeling great.

My Breca Swimrun teammate has informed me he’s just ordered this wetsuit. I really need to get some funds together to get mine sorted now. I foresee a clearout of the loft, ebay here I come!

 

 

The Long Run – Are we getting it wrong?

I wanted to post a few thoughts I’ve been having recently on Long Runs.

I’m not saying these are right, or indeed wrong. But they’ve been making more and more sense to me and I wanted to write them down so I don’t forget them. Also I hope I can get a few people’s thoughts on them, let me know if you think I’m onto something, or if I’m missing something completely.

In particular I’m addressing the Long Run which is usually a staple part of a Marathon training plan. Most plans will have you go up to 20 miles, or further, at least once. Its become a magic number, one that must be reached in training regardless of how many times you might run in a week, or your overall mileage.
I’ve been there myself, the 20 milers loom large on that plan stuck to the fridge. They fill you with dread at the start of the cycle, but they’re set in stone. You have to do them if you want to be able to run 26.2 on the day.

And actually, these thoughts apply if you’re not running a marathon too.

My experience with 20+ mile training runs is that they knock me for six. I run them at the right pace, I fuel them right, but they still bugger up my training for the week ahead. And that goes for 18 milers too.

In fact, I’ve found my limit where I can consistently maintain training week in/week out, and its 2 hours. I did a 2 hour Time Trial last week and at current fitness levels thats just over 16 miles for me. As soon as my sessions start going over this threshold, fatigue creeps in to the point where I have to start missing training.

Funnily enough, that coincides with what I’ve been reading in Hansons Marathon Method. The long run in their plans goes up to 16miles, but the whole plan is consistent high mileage. They do suggest taking the long run longer if your overall weekly mileage is up around 80+, but I would guess this correlates roughly with a 2 hour session anyway.

I wonder what the elites do? They’ll be planning to be out on the course for just over 2 hours so why would they want to run training sessions that go way over that, its just not specific to their goals. Its not beyond the realms that they might do a 20 mile run in 2 hours several times in preparation is it?

It strikes me that this golden figure has rolled down from the top performers, back in the 80’s running boom when there were loads of runners out there running 2:40 and quicker, and become a target for everyone.

Interestingly, without me mentioning any of these thoughts, a club-mate approached me with a research paper he’d read that said no positive adaptations occur in the Mitochondria after 2 hours. In fact, the muscles begin to break down at this point, actually causing damage, essentially causing more harm than good. (wish I had a link for this, it sounded really interesting)
He said that the biggest adaptations to the Mitochondria occur when running for shorter periods at higher intensity. For example 15mins at 5k pace will bring about more increased Mitochondria function than a 90 minute run. Of course, this doesn’t solve the issue of specificity if you’re training for a marathon.

The key points for me at the moment:

  • Long Run should equal 20-30% of weekly total
  • Long Run should not exceed 2 hours
  • Long Run should be a staple workout, regardless of distance training for
  • Long Run pace shouldn’t be set in stone: If it feels too fast for a given day, It probably is, dial it back a bit.

We’re all different and what works for me might not work for you, but one thing is certain, consistent, injury free running yields results. And this is my preferred approach at the moment.

In my own context, I’ve managed to maintain high mileage (50-70miles per week), and set a 5k PB within days of a 2hr TT so its working for me.

I haven’t yet gone into a marathon with this method, but I’m planning on it at some point and I’ll be sure to let you know how I get on.

Please remember, these are just my current thoughts on it, pick it apart if you like, tell me why I’m wrong (or tell me why I’m right!) – I’d appreciate any input.

 

Here’s a link to some further reading if you’re interested
http://www.pponline.co.uk/encyc/0129.htm

 

 

 

Race Report: Splash Point 5k – 18:11

tuffteam
failing to put my arms in the air

Mile 1:
The starter got us underway with an underwhelming “3,2,1…go” and I flew off along the seafront in a desperate bid not to be trampled by all the quicker runners behind me. But where were they all? I had 2 guys in front of me, and my trackmate (wingman) Andy on my right shoulder, matching me stride for stride.
I became aware of another guys footsteps with us, his cadence was quicker and it was putting me off, I zoned out and focussed on my footsteps and breathing.
Split Time: 5:35 (a 1mile PB – Ha! Try holding on to that, muppet)

start
No 384 – centre screen, almost false starting.

Mile 2:
Still feeling very comfortable, the 2 guys in front weren’t going anwhere, Andy and Quickfeet were still on my shoulder. I was still wondering where everyone was. Approaching the turnaround point I nearly got taken out by a radio-controlled car, it stopped me from eyeballing the 2 guys ahead as they came back the other way which was a shame. I came to a standstill as I hit the turnaround and launched into the headwind. I was surprised to see that my group had 30m or so on the next runner. I still didn’t know who Quickfeet was but he was hiding right behind me, and I could hear that Andy was starting to struggle. My pace was starting to drop in the wind and I hit Mile 2 in 5:50.

Mile 3.1:
The reassuring presence of my wingman suddenly disappeared as the wind took its toll. And suddenly, Quickfeet came by me, I slotted in straight behind him and took some shelter. He was really strong into the wind and I lasted about a minute before he dropped me. (In hindsight, I should have stayed with him as he never got further than 30m ahead, once he’d made the gap it was too hard to reel it in). And that was pretty much it, a hard slog into a 16mph headwind with no-one for company.
Split: 6:17 + 0:28s

 

The Verdict

A MASSIVE NEW PB: 18:11 – thats an 82s improvement and 4th place Overall. I’m over the moon but also cursing that wind.

1st place for the both the Mens and Womens Team race too. Result.

running
bringing it home in a solitary 4th place

#Swimrun Training – Week 2

Total Miles: 67.3 Miles + 3k swim
Average Pace:
 7:59min/mile – includes some run walk stuff & half a mile with a 4/yo
Longest Run: 16 Miles (Saturday) = 24% of weekly total
Speedwork: 3 miles = 4% of weekly total

week2
biggest mileage week – ever

Monday: 8 miles – the goal was to maintain a steady pace of 7:30min/mile and to be done in an hour. The route I’d chosen specifically to make this difficult. Twice up to the windmill at High Salvington from 2 different approaches, both involving a mile long climb. I let the downhills take care of themselves as I knew these would be well below target pace.

My Garmin uploads via my work computer so it wasn’t until Tuesday morning that I was rewarded with this on Strava for my efforts. (Always nice to chalk up a Course Record)

crS
Course Record on a tough hill climb

Tuesday: 4 miles recovery at lunchtime, 6 miles steady in the evening.
Wednesday: Track – 8.5 miles including Warmups, cool downs and recoveries
Thursday: Run/Swim/Run – 15.4 miles + 3k
Saturday: Long Run – 16 miles
Sunday: Easy Runs – 7.7 miles + Epsom Salt Recovery Bath!

Track Workout of the Week:

Pyramid Workout
4×200 // 2×400 // 2×800 \\ 2×400 \\ 4×200
Rolling Recoveries: 200m jog after the 200’s, 400 jog all others.
Total: 5.5miles plus warm ups and cool down
Max HR: 177

This one was superb. Cheers to Coach Wardy for suggesting it.  The track session started with a very relaxed atmosphere as we worked our way through the warm up and mobility drills. There were a number of athletes who had just come back from Half and Full marathons in Vienna, a couple of runners who would be racing Brighton Marathon in a few days time and Coach Wardy had just arrived back from a 3 week Road Trip in the USA. Plenty of fun was had picking on Wardy for his newly acquired American accent and we put out a rallying call for the Splash Point 5k next week. (21 Tuffs entered so far I believe – we could be on for a record)

After the long reps of late it was nice knowing the efforts could be run a lot harder. We set off on the first 200m with joyful recklessness, I think Tom hit it in about 33-34 secs although he must have peaked early as he was somewhere behind us for the rest of the session. I kept my 4 reps at a steady 36-37secs (5:00m/m) before we moved on to the 400’s. Two of these both on 1:23 (5:33m/m), so far so good. The dreaded 800’s were next but I actually found these pretty comfortable aerobically. My legs were starting to disagree after the faster work at the beginning of the set, my quads were beginning to feel pretty solid, and my glutes were screaming. Despite this, we went through these in 2:58 each (5:56m/m) and it was onto the faster reps again.
The pace increased as we sailed through the 400’s in 1:25 and 1:23 before we hit the final set of 200’s. My legs didn’t feel like they had anything left in them for hard efforts but I was pleased with 38s, 39s, 34s and 36s.

IMG_20160413_204047
Gococo Compression Socks keeping my calves fresh

This was a fast paced session and I only just about held it together at the end. Those 200’s are pretty much my top end speed, I certainly couldn’t have run those ones at the end any quicker.
I tried to focus on a fast turnover, engaged arms, high hips and really pushing the ground away from me with every stride. It really helps your overall running economy to do quick work like this.

After 10 minutes of chatting I clocked an extra 2 miles to cool down, no-one else stuck around for this but it was a nice evening to idle away some time running round in circles.

A good strong session to go into next weeks 5k race with.

Favourite Session of the Week

Hard to choose actually, I really enjoyed my running, every session felt like I was running well, or at least achieving something. I think the benchmark run for me was my Long Run on Saturday evening.
For a while now I’ve been thinking that my 2 hour pace was about 7:30min/miles and I wanted to go out and test this. I laced up, put some gels in my pocket (one every 6 miles) and off I went to see how long I could hold on. As the miles ticked by I could see I was about 10s quicker per mile, I started having negative thoughts cross my mind and I’d already planned my escape route home if I needed to cut the effort short.
But I remained pretty comfortable throughout, even hitting my quickest split at mile 14. (7:04 if you’re asking) Yes, my glutes were burning but that was to be expected towards the end of a pretty tough week.

My average pace for the run was 7:19 m/m which I’m really happy with. Thats a 16 miler in 1:57. And thats pretty much as long as my longest run is going to get. Anything further than that and I tend to get injuries creeping in. If I can keep up these weeks of high mileage with my longest run only going up to 2 hours then I’m going to be in really good shape come July.

What Else?

My Run/Swim/Run session increased the mileage each way to just over 7.5 miles, and this week it was raining hard. So with the swim in the middle this was a mentally demanding set which I could have backed out of easily at various points.

Finally

3forts
The sensible option!

I made my mind up about the 3 Forts Challenge and decided that the Half Marathon fits into my training much better. If I do the full marathon, I ‘ll get round it, but it’ll wipe my training out for a week with 2 months to go until Breca. So I’ve gone for the half, and I’ll try and race it.

Talking of races, its the Splash Point 5k on Wednesday. I’ll be taking it easy for a couple of days now in the hope of setting a new PB. Bring it on!